Warnken, LLC Attorneys at Law, Attorneys & Lawyers, Pikesville, MD

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Maryland Case Search

NEW: InjuryLawyerDatabase.com, a website aggregating data from Case Search to form statistics on lawyers and defendants, has gone live.  Read their blog post on their data and Maryland Case Search.  An excellent resource!!

Maryland Case Search, or Maryland Judiciary Case Search as it is properly called, is an excellent tool for accessing the Court system in Maryland.  Case Search has access to all 24 of Maryland’s Counties, and accesses both the circuit courts and the district courts.  The information provided is substantial.

Maryland Judiciary Case Search has numerous uses:

  • Checking court dates
  • Seeing how a particular case was resolved
  • Searching the database for old cases
  • Searching potential roommates or employees
  • Even checking out a blind date

Case Search can also be used to see:

  • Attorneys
  • Civil or Criminal Cases
  • Traffic Cases
  • Plaintiffs
  • Defendants

CLICK HERE for the Maryland Judiciary Case Search Website.  

Maryland Case Search is especially useful in that you can search by name or by case number.  Most other states do not have as comprehensive of a resource as MD Judiciary Case Search.  The fact that each MD county is in one place makes the website especially useful.

 

If you are searching for Maryland appellate opinions, they can be found here, for both the Court of Appeals and the Court of Special Appeals.

One important note about Maryland Case Search: It’s not always perfectly accurate.  While it is by far the most comprehensive resource around, and more thorough than other states, it is not 100%.  The site even lists in its disclaimer that the scope of the information, historical info, and the timeliness and reliability of information is not always perfect.  It’s just a good reminder to have.  In addition, when data is inputted into the system, occasionally there are spelling mistakes.  One way to catch certain mistakes is to enter the first letter of the first name.  Therefore, a search for Jonathan Doe would be “Doe, Jonathan” and “Doe, J.”  This is an especially useful trick if it seems information might be missing.